About Vintage Sari Garments

I will be listing two vintage sari garments this weeekend and thought I’d give you a bit of information from Wikipedia and a video on how to wear or wrap a sari.

Vintage Printed Georgette Silk Sari

Vintage Printed Georgette Silk Sari

Saris are woven with one plain end (the end that is concealed inside the wrap), two long decorative borders running the length of the sari, and a one to three-foot section at the other end which continues and elaborates the length-wise decoration. This end is called the pallu; it is the part thrown over the shoulder in the nivi style of draping.

Vintage saris are woven of silk or cotton. The rich wore finely woven, diaphanous silk saris and the poor wore coarsely woven cotton saris. All saris were handwoven and represented a considerable investment of time or money.

More expensive saris had elaborate geometric, floral, or figurative ornaments or brocades created on the loom, as part of the fabric. Sometimes warp and weft threads were tie-dyed and then woven, creatingikat patterns. Sometimes threads of different colours were woven into the base fabric in patterns; an ornamented border, an elaborate pallu, and often, small repeated accents in the cloth itself. These accents are called buttis or bhuttis (spellings vary). For fancy saris, these patterns could be woven with gold or silver thread, which is called zari work.

Zardozi Embroidered Red Sari

Zardozi Embroidered Red Sari

Sometimes the saris were further decorated, after weaving, with various sorts of embroidery. Resham work is embroidery done with coloured silk thread. Zardozi embroidery uses gold and silver thread, and sometimes pearls and precious stones.

Hand-woven, hand-decorated saris are naturally much more expensive than the machine imitations. While the overall market for handweaving has plummeted (leading to much distress among Indian handweavers), hand-woven saris are still popular for weddings and other grand social occasions.

 

 

You Tube Video on how to drape a sari

Source: Wikipedia

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